When Do You Know Loved Ones Need Care?

By Pam Gennings, Executive Director Special Projects*

Over the years I have talked to many family members who come home for the holidays and become concerned because they have noticed “changes” in their loved one or their circumstances.

They are not always sure if home care services are needed or if their concern is unfounded. The following indicators can be used as a guide to help determine if your loved one could benefit from home care services.

Medical Condition

  • New diagnosis
  • New medications or treatments ordered by a physician
  • Terminal illness
  • Recently discharged from a hospital or nursing facility
  • Physician has restricted activity during a period of recuperation—this could be a few days or several weeks
  • Frequent falls or fear of falling
  • Confusion, forgetfulness, depression or other changes in mental status
  • No longer able to/should not drive or driving is very limited
  • Frequent trips to the doctor, urgent care or ER
  • Uses an assistive device (cane, walker, wheelchair or stair climber) to help with balance or walking
  • Is required to take several daily medications

Caregiver Relief

  • The person being cared for should not be left alone and may require 24-hour supervision
  • Spouse/family members work
  • Caregiver appears to be stressed and overwhelmed
  • Spouse/family members in poor health
  • The person being cared for needs more assistance than the caregiver is able or willing to provide

Strong Desire to Remain at Home But is Unsure of How to Manage Because…

  • There is limited support from family or others
  • Spouse is in poor health
  • They worry about emergency situations
  • Family does not want loved one to be alone
  • They need assistance with housekeeping, laundry, meal preparation, shopping, bathing, hair care, medication reminders, transportation, or other essential daily tasks

If your loved one has one or more of the indicators listed above, call Oxford HealthCare and ask to speak with a Care Coordinator.

A qualified home care professional will:

  • Identify needs and available services
  • Evaluate funding sources and community services
  • Coordinate services upon request 

*Pam Gennings has a Bachelor’s of Arts and has worked in the field of Geriatric Social Work and Care Coordination for more than 30 years. She started working for Oxford HealthCare in 1993. During the course of her career she has helped thousands of people find resources to remain in their homes as well as provided guidance to families that were facing difficulties with their aging loved ones.

Don’t Get Scammed by Home Repair Schemes

By Pam Gennings, Executive Director Special Projects*

Just like migrating birds arrive as the weather warms, so do the scammers. Home repair con artists are out in force this time of year—“flocking” to your neighborhood. These scammers are looking to make a quick buck; and unfortunately, older adults are most vulnerable.

 

According to the National Consumer League, the most common types of home repair scams are:

  • Duct cleaning
  • Driveway sealant
  • Leaky foundations
  • Landscaping
  • Furnace and roof repair

Don’t be a victim—know the signs!

  1. A contractor shows up uninvited, or will call or email out of the blue.
  2. The contractor tells you he/she is in the neighborhood and has “extra material” left over.
  3. The person pressures you to make a decision today because the “special offer” is for today only.
  4. The contractor points out a “problem” or offers a “free” inspection. Some scammers have been known to break something on purpose so they can be paid to “fix” the problem.
  5. The person demands full payment up front and usually wants cash.
  6. The individual has no identification or permits from the county or city.
  7. You are offered a discount so your home may be used as a “model”.
  8. The contractor wants to show you the “damage”, while an associate steals valuables from your home.

 

Tips to avoid being scammed by home repair con artists:

  1. Don’t allow yourself to be pressured. You have the right to say NO!
  2. Get several estimates on any home repair job.
  3. Check references including checking with the Better Business Bureau.
  4. Never pay in full up front, especially if paying by cash.
  5. It is very important that the contractor is insured and bonded—ask to see proof.
  6. Make sure everything is put in writing. Carefully read all the contracts and be sure you fully understand the scope of the work to be done, cost and time necessary to complete the job. Have in writing how payment will be handled. Make sure you understand the contract cancellation and refund terms.
  7. Ask for advice from a trusted friend or family member, especially if you are feeling pressured or have questions and concerns.

If you suspect you have been the victim of a scam, don’t be afraid or embarrassed to tell someone you trust. You can turn to the police, go to your bank if money has been taken from your account or seek help from adult protective services. In Missouri the adult protective service toll free number is 1-800-392-0210. To find the adult protective service contact information in other states, call the Eldercare Locator, a government sponsored resource line, at 1-800-677-1116 or at www.eldercare.gov.

 

Excerpts from National Council on Aging and National Consumer League

 

*Pam Gennings has a Bachelor’s of Arts and has worked in the field of Geriatric Social Work and Care Coordination for more than 30 years. She started working for Oxford HealthCare in 1993. During the course of her career she has helped thousands of people find resources to remain in their homes as well as provided guidance to families that were facing difficulties with their aging loved ones.

 

“When words fail, music speaks” Hans Christian Anderson

By Carol Combs, MSW – Oxford’s Memory Care Program Coordinator

While working in a skilled nursing facility, I had the opportunity to witness remarkable things. I was amazed to see individuals with dementia who could not put together a sentence, but could sing an entire song. Their faces would brighten, and I could see mood changes along with toe tapping and smiles. Soon, others would join in. Although the disease had taken so much away from them, music was a wonderful way to engage and encourage them.

The language area of the brain is impacted early in the Alzheimer’s disease process, but music touches a different part of the brain. The area of the brain linked to music is relatively unaffected by Alzheimer’s disease; so musical memories are often preserved. Rhythmic responses require little to no cognitive processing; so, a person’s ability to engage in music—particularly rhythm playing and singing—remains intact late into the disease process. Some individuals will respond to music when nothing else seems to reach them.

Music can provide emotional and behavioral benefits for dementia sufferers. Listening to music or singing can relieve stress and reduce agitation, anxiety or depression. For caregivers, music is a way to connect with loved ones who have difficulty communicating. Most people associate music with important events and emotions, and selections from a person’s young adult years—ages 18-25—are more likely to elicit a strong response. As an individual progresses into later stage dementia, music from childhood works well. Although individuals may not be able to verbalize or demonstrate affection with loved ones, they can still move with the beat of a favorite piece of music until very late in the disease process.

Caregiver Tips:

  • Experiment with different types of music to see which evoke the best reaction.
  • Play music or sing as the individual is walking to improve balance or gait.
  • Choose relaxing music, a familiar, non-rhythmic song to reduce sun downing or bedtime issues.
  • Compile a musical history of favorite recordings to help with reminiscing and recalling memories.
  • Encourage movement with the music —clapping or tapping feet, or dancing if possible.
  • Play or sing soothing songs to calm someone during mealtime or personal hygiene care.
  • When playing music, eliminate competing noises such as television or outdoor sounds.

Singing is associated with safety and security from early life. When caregivers engage in singing with their loved ones, it provides an opportunity to connect, even when the disease has deprived them of traditional forms of closeness.

“Music is the literature of the heart; it commences where speech ends.”
Alphonse de Lamartine

Oxford Hospice provides numerous home care programs—including music therapy—to help caregivers and their loved ones. Oxford HealthCare is dedicated to helping families enjoy time together and remain at home. If you have questions about Oxford Hospice, Oxford’s Memory Care Program or receiving help at home, please contact a Care Coordinator, today.

 

Source: Alzheimer’s Foundation of America

 

Walk a Mile in Their Shoes

By Carol Combs, MSW Oxford’s Memory Care Coordinator

After my recent hip surgery, I not only gained a new hip, but also a newfound understanding of what it must be like for those who are ill, disabled and homebound.

I have always been a very independent person, so being dependent for almost everything during my recovery did not come easy for me. I needed help to get up from a chair, get into bed, to use the bathroom and bathe. I couldn’t stand long enough to fix a meal. I was frustrated and impatient with myself, even though I was told to expect weeks or months of recuperation.

Empathy is the ability to understand and share the feelings of another. We all try to empathize, and sometimes say, “I know how you feel.”

But, do we really?

Maybe instead we should just say, “This must be difficult for you,” and offer support and a hug. As you encounter those who are struggling and need care and support, think about how challenging their lives may be and try to “walk a mile in their shoes.” I know I will.

Fortunately, I had a great caregiver in my husband and other family members. I am very grateful, because I know that not everyone has that kind of support. If you or someone you know is in need of help and support—whether it be short term or long term help—please call and speak to one of our Care Coordinators, they will be glad to assist you.

 

George’s Beautiful Journey

By Marian Michaliszyn, Oxford Hospice Chaplain

Serene Forest PathWhen George was a child, his mom told him that “religion is good, but take it in small amounts.” So many years later, when he decided on hospice care, he declined chaplain visits for himself. He did request visits for his wife, because he thought it would help her after his death.

What George did not count on was the connection he and I made during the months I visited. Our visits began with general conversation, which then led to issues he’d had on his mind for decades.

George wanted to talk about his life journey starting with his childhood during World War II. He shared about high school and how he and his friends fixed up an old roadster and took turns driving it. He told me about a wonderful girl he met in high school who became his wife.

George spoke of his time in the Korean War and how the GI bill led to his career in communications. He considered himself a “self-made man” whose life choices and decisions brought him from California to Missouri.

Eventually, our conversations turned to religion. He told me about his experience at a tent revival at age 11 and about dismissing God and embracing science. Perhaps remembering his mother’s advice, George often said, “Religion had the last 3,000 years of rule in the lives of humans and now it’s time to let science have the next 100 years to shape society, and then see which is better.”

One day, we had a very powerful visit. When I arrived, George wanted to get away from his house so we could talk privately. We went to his boat dock, and George stated that he had a horrible night. He was confronted by the reality of his death and what happens afterword. There was a feeling of darkness and foreboding, and for the first time in his life he did not feel in control.

As we talked about the reality of death and making peace with God, I actively listened and offered faith resourcing as we discussed the meaning of life and George’s spiritual journey. As we shared with each other, George came to a place of resolving his questions of faith, religion and having peace in his spiritual life.

Not long after that visit, George died. When I went to see his wife and family, they shared how they all noticed George’s peaceful smile on his face. This was a great comfort to his family.

It was a privilege to share this part of George’s journey, and a privilege to continue the journey with bereavement support for his wife and children. With all the experiences, questions and concerns he shared, I was honored that he trusted me to be a non-judgmental listener.

What an amazing life he lived, and what a beautiful journey.

 

Customize Your Care

By Pam Gennings, Executive Director Special Projects *

As you get older, do you wonder if you will still be able to do the things you love such as: travel, attend concerts, plays or movies, go shopping, eat out, do crafts, feed your backyard birds, take drives to see the beautiful countryside, or visit with friends and neighbors?

You can do all of these things and more when you customize your care with private duty services from Oxford HealthCare. With private duty services, you are in control of your care—as much, or as little, as needed.

There are some exceptional home care programs available that are paid for through insurance benefits such as: Medicare, Medicaid, VA or private health insurance. These programs are based on need and have qualifiers that a person must meet in order to receive care. There are also guidelines that control the care you receive.

If you qualify for care through one of these programs, that is great. However, if you don’t qualify, or want more than they offer, you should consider private duty services.

To learn more about private duty services and how you can customize your care, please call and speak to one of our Care Coordinators. They will be happy to customize quality-of-life services just for you.

 

*Pam Gennings has a Bachelor’s of Arts and has worked in the field of Geriatric Social Work and Care Coordination for more than 30 years. She started working for Oxford HealthCare in 1993. During the course of her career she has helped thousands of people find resources to remain in their homes as well as provided guidance to families that were facing difficulties with their aging loved ones.