Mobile Technology Allows More Seniors to Stay Safe and Healthy at Home

senior technology has many faces

More seniors are embracing in-home health technology.

Seniors have been historically slow to join the digital revolution. But over the past several years, technology adoption rates for seniors have strongly outpaced the overall adult population, according to a Pew Research Center study.

And there’s no better time to jump on the digital bandwagon. Phones, tablets and computers have never been easier to use, and the latest advances in home technology include voice-directed digital assistants, like Google Home and Amazon Echo. These small tabletop units can place phone calls, send text messages, change TV channels, browse the internet and even shop online – all without the user lifting a finger or touching a device.

But some of the biggest impacts of senior technology are in the area of healthcare. As the movement toward aging in place continues, more people are expected to use electronic communications to access their healthcare provider network. Many geriatricians and other senior care providers are beginning to conduct tele-health check-ups via Skype or other teleconference platform.

Wearable senior technology

wearable senior technology

Wearable technology devices can help keep seniors safe, healthy and living independently.

Wrist-bound devices like FitBit health trackers and Apple’s iWatch are opening up new channels for patient health. These devices can monitor motion, heart rate, and even sleep patterns – all of which can alert healthcare providers to warning signs or developing medical issues.

Today, this type of mobile technology allows patients to extend their independence and remain safe at home, while providing peace of mind for themselves and loved ones. Our Oxford Healthcare solution is called LifeLine, and we have three service options to fit your needs;

HomeSafe

This service provides at-home coverage that uses either a landline or wireless technology to connect the patient with caregivers. Our 24-hour Response Center, is staffed 365 days/year, and the waterproof wearable pendant can summon help with a simple push of the button.

HomeSafe with AutoAlert

AutoAlert adds automatic fall detection and reporting to the above benefits. The system utilizes predictive CareSage analytics, and can not only report falls, but can also help prevent them.

GoSafe

Our mobile version of the HomeSafe solution includes the AutoAlert features. For active seniors, it adds GPS-enabled location services and two-way mobile communication. These features provide safety and security, wherever life’s journey takes you.

Gerijoy tablet for seniors

Gerijoy tablets offer senior users important reminders and encourage social interaction.

Seniors can also stay connected through a user-friendly GeriJoy tablet, which provides 24/7 access to a team of caregivers and enables two-way communication via touchscreen. This better connects care processes and provides a human connection that improves both medical outcomes and quality of life. The GeriJoy tablet also provides important alerts and reminders for the patient, as well as stimulating social interaction.

If you already use a smartphone, check out AARP’s list of helpful health-related apps. If you are interested in one of our Oxford solutions mentioned above, reach out to one of our Care Coordinators. They’ll be happy to help choose the senior technology solution that best suits YOU.

 

Why Go If My Loved One Can’t Remember My Visit?

By Carol Combs, MSW, Oxford’s Memory Care Coordinator

When a loved one has Alzheimer’s disease, it changes the way friends and family interact with the person. Knowing what to say, or even how to act, can be challenging. The individual may not remember those who come to visit or remember prior visits.

When visiting a loved one with Alzheimer’s you may hear questions such as, “Why don’t you ever visit?” or “Who are you?” Such questions, as well as behavioral changes that accompany the disease, can make visiting difficult and uncomfortable.

However, there are some things you can do to help ease the discomfort and make your visit more pleasant for you and your loved one.

  • Focus on feelings – the content of the conversation doesn’t matter. The feelings and sense of contentment created will make a difference. Emotion lasts longer than memory. The emotion resulting from a positive visit can improve a person’s mood and influence the rest of the day.
  • Accept the person’s reality- don’t correct your loved one, just go along with it. If the person insists the grass is blue, agree. Telling the individual it’s really green can create agitation. Instead, offer reassurance and distraction.
  • Introduce yourself- avoid saying “Don’t you remember me?” because if the person doesn’t, it can be embarrassing. Introduce yourself with “Hi Mom, this is Susan.”  Save her the embarrassment or awkward moment.
  • Be respectful- don’t talk to Alzheimer’s patients like they are children. They have a lifetime of experiences, so show them the respect they deserve.
  • Bring an activity – long-term memory is often still intact. Reminiscing with pictures or photo albums can be comforting and encourage conversation. Play music or sing. Consider Music Therapy. Music can stir positive emotions, and individuals may be able to remember lyrics even though their ability to communicate has declined. Exercise improves brain circulation. Encourage movement of arms and legs, or toss a beach ball. Introduce your loved one to a GeriJoy Companion, a special tablet which provides social interaction, helps decrease loneliness and has shown remarkable success with Alzheimer’s and dementia patients.
  • Touch – hold a hand, stroke hair, hug. Touch is a powerful way to communicate when words fail. People with dementia recognize a caring touch, even in the late stages of the disease.
  • Minimize distractions – it will be more difficult to have a meaningful visit if there is too much noise or activity. Over stimulation can cause agitation. Try to find a quiet place or take a walk outside.

If you know someone with Alzheimer’s and are hesitant to visit, remember that the benefit of your visit may last long after you’ve gone.

For additional support or information, contact Oxford HealthCare. Oxford offers numerous programs that provide the help and relief you need—so you can enjoy time with your loved one and continue to provide care at home. For your peace of mind, advanced technology like Lifeline and GeriJoy helps provide added security when you can’t be with your loved one. To find out more about all Oxford has to help families, contact a Care Coordinator, today.