Help for the Sandwich Generation

Help for The Sandwich Generation

Balancing Family Life with Children and Aged Parents

It’s probably not the sort of sandwich we had in mind. As we gratefully see generations of our family living longer, many families feel crushed by the duties of caring for parents and children at the same time. In fact, a Pew Research Center study finds that one out of every eight adults age 40 to 60 is both raising a child and caring for a parent. And the number of older persons to care for is estimated to grow to more than 72 million by 2030.

It’s not just demanding. The nature of these demands is unique. Constant awareness and attention is called for, and this takes a kind of energy that most people never experience until they become parents. You’re always “on.”

Unexpected Occurrences Enter the Picture

Yet, with an aged family member in the household, too, some of the events that come with aging – and often with disability – can be unpredictable. Accidents and sudden changes in the family member’s condition can prompt doctor calls and emergency room visits that upend the most well-planned household. Even small children have a more predictable rhythm.

Add to this picture the effort involved in a person’s own career and work obligations, and we see a very difficult way of life by any standard. So, when the duties and demands of caregiving go in both directions, people sometimes feel they are on the brink of exhaustion much of the time.

Financial Burden Grows Faster Than the Family

Because the cost of prescriptions often rises, and because medical attention usually increases with age, the cost of caring for parents can grow faster than the cost for children. Sandwich households have an extra hard time planning, budgeting, and keeping up with costs unless they put experienced help on their side.

Relief Is a Family Necessity

Taking care of yourself is a key ingredient in the sandwich generation household. The people depending on you are equally dependent on your staying well and happy, and so a whole sector of healthcare, known as respite care, is taking shape to provide the relief that home caregivers need.

With our rich background in home care and our wide array of services, Oxford HealthCare is uniquely qualified to offer you the selection of support that’s right for you, your home and your family.

The Oxford HealthCare Spectrum of Services

The kinds of services Oxford HealthCare can provide are so extensive and detailed that perhaps the best way to describe them is this: If it happens, we can help you with it. From a few hours or a day a week to round-the-clock care, Oxford HealthCare is committed to providing you the support that enables you to regain a sense of control and confidence.

With a planned program of care designed particularly for the needs of the family member you’re caring for, unexpected events are often avoided. Costs become more predictable, so you can plan more effectively. And people tell us that the sense that they’re not alone in this commitment is worth a great deal.

Contact one of our Care Coordinators and let’s begin talking about the kind of care that may be right for you and your family. Restoring your sense of balance and security as you care for your loved ones is a mission that’s a privilege for us to join.

Taking Care of YOU: Tips for caregivers

caregiver stress

Caregiver stress can affect sleep, relationships — even your health.

If you’ve spent time taking care of a newborn, disabled child, incapacitated adult or aging parent, you know that it’s a big challenge. But were you aware that caregivers are more likely to experience symptoms of physical, emotional and psychological stress? That’s why it’s important to take care of yourself so you can continue taking care of your loved ones.

A Growing Need

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, there are more than 40 million unpaid caregivers in the United States. Of these, nearly 9 in 10 are caring for a relative, and 60 percent provide care for an aging parent or grandparent.

The current national trend shows an increasing number of older adults opting to “age in place.”  People are choosing to remain in the home throughout their senior years, instead of a retirement community or nursing facility. All of this is leading to a greater overall demand for every type of in-home care.

A Tough Job

A caregiver – sometimes called an informal caregiver – is an unpaid individual (a spouse, partner, family member, friend, or neighbor) who assists others with routine daily activities and/or health-related medical tasks. By contrast, formal caregivers – such as our professionals at Oxford – are paid care providers who deliver care in a patient’s home or in a care setting (day care, residential facility, long-term care facility).

Caregiving tasks may range from simple companionship and wellness checks, to basic medical tasks, including some medications. These varied demands are especially challenging for untrained caregivers, compared to home care professionals at Oxford. Stress is often compounded by unpredictable behavior of children with developmental delays, or seniors with dementia-related conditions.

The all-hours nature of informal caregiving often leads to unmanageable stress for the caregiver, particularly if the patient is a loved one or family member. This stress can leave caregivers feeling burned out and isolated. This is especially true if you are “on duty” for long stretches of time without respite or assistance. It can also increase your risk for everything from anxiety to depression, as well as physical impacts such as fatigue and decreased immune resistance.

Coping Strategies

Oxford offers a variety of information and resources for caregivers. Consider taking steps to reduce your stress before it becomes an issue that could impact care, or your family relationships. The Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN offers the following tips:

  • –  Accept help
  • –  Focus on what you CAN do
  • –  Set realistic goals
  • –  Connect to resources
  • –  Seek family/friend support
  • –  Set personal health goals
  • –  Join a support group
  • –  See your doctor

If you are able to continue providing care, we salute you. If you feel you cannot continue to provide a safe, healthy environment by yourself, Oxford understands. We have helped thousands of caregivers just like you with respite care resources, part-time assistance or other support. Contact one of our Care Coordinators and they will be happy to provide resources and options to help.

National Nurses Week Starts Today!

National Nurses Week is May 6-12

National Nurses Week is May 6 – 12 – Make sure you let your caregivers know you appreciate them! 

Has your life been improved by a member of the nursing profession? You have a great opportunity coming up this week to say “Thanks!” and let them know they have made a positive impact on you.

National Nurses Week

Since 1990, the week of May 6–12 has officially been the national observance of Nurses Week. However, the movement for greater nurse recognition had been in progress since the 1950’s, according to the American Nurses Association (ANA).

The focus of this year’s celebration will be “Nursing: the Balance of Mind, Body and Spirit,” and will pay special attention to Health & Wellness nurses. Additionally, the ANA is offering resources giving nurses tools to battle the fatigue, moral distress and burnout – all of which are common across  caregiver professions.

A Valued Profession

This year’s celebration comes on the heels of 2016 survey results released by Gallup, a company that internationally conducts economic, business, political, and social polls. For the 15th year in a row, nurses ranked as the “Most Trusted Professionals.”  Of particular note, the study results showed that;

  • One in six people (84 percent) surveyed rated the honesty and ethical standards of nurses as “High” or “Very High”
  • Nurses ratings were 25 percent higher than the next closest profession (pharmacists), which scored 67 percent
  • Doctors, engineers, dentists and police officers were the next group of most-trusted, with insurance and car salespeople on extreme low end of the list, and members of Congress occupying the least-trusted spot

Celebrate Your Favorite Nurse

We also encourage YOU to let a nurse know how they’ve positively impacted your life. If a particular nurse has made a real difference for you or a family member, let us know by sending a short “Thank You” note on our contact page. We’ll make sure that they get the message!

 

The Skin You’re In: Preventing Pressure Ulcers

Good skin health is important to living a full and active lifestyle

By Corrie Dinwiddie, RN
Oxford HealthCare Wound Coordinator

The skin is the largest organ of the human body. According to the online journal LiveScience.com, the average person’s skin counts for 16 percent of their total weight, and spans a surface area of 22 square feet. It is also one of the most important organs for our general health, helping to:

  • Maintain your body temperature
  • Protect you from germs
  • Gather information for your nervous system
  • Assess and react to your surroundings (e.g. heat, cold, pain, sensory touch)

To function properly, your skin needs adequate attention and proper care. A break-down in your overall skin health can put you at risk for injury and disease.

Possible Skin Problems

Even if you have healthy skin, problems may occur if you are immobile for long periods of time, especially in a lying or sitting position. When this happens, pressure from your body weight on the bed or chair surface cuts off the blood supply to skin. As a result, those skin cells don’t get the oxygen and nutrients they need to survive, and a pressure ulcer may result.

Pressure ulcers occur from prolonged sitting or laying

The condition mainly occurs on skin areas that cover a bone or bulge, such as heels, shoulders, hips, and upper buttocks. Pressure ulcers have many names, including:

  • Bedsore Decubitus (de-KU-bi-tus) ulcers
  • Dermal wounds
  • Pressure sores

Risk Factors for a Pressure Ulcer

You may be at risk for a pressure ulcer if you are experiencing:

  • Limited activity or confined to bed
  • Reduced tactile sensation (sense of touch)
  • Chronic, complicated medical problems such as diabetes, obesity, smoking, poor circulation, and spinal cord injury
  • Increased skin moisture from bladder or bowel control issues
  • Poor diet or nutrition Low protein intake, especially if nutrition is already poor

Older adults are more at risk for a pressure ulcer, as are patients who slide down in the bed. Sliding down can cause friction that may tear delicate or already damaged skin.

Symptoms of a Pressure Ulcer

If you have a pressure ulcer, you may have burning, aching, or itching at the site. The injured skin may be red or bruised, or have a purplish discoloration that continues even after you shift position. People with darker skin tones may not show redness or discoloration, and some may need to compare the injured area with uninjured skin tissue.

A pressure ulcer may feel firm or mushy, and may be warm to the touch. Swelling and tenderness are common, and a blister or shallow sore may develop. Sometimes a clear or blood-tinged fluid may drain from the ulcer area. If un-noticed or un-treated, the wound may deepen and extend into the fat layer or adipose (ADD-ih-pose) tissue, or even down to the bone. Pressure ulcers are sometimes categorized in stages (Stage I, Stage II, etc.), based on how deeply the tissue is injured.

Stages of bedsores and pressure ulcers

What Can You Do to Help Prevent a Pressure Ulcer?

You and your family members are important to the prevention and care of a pressure ulcer. Your skin health can be improved when general steps are taken, including:

  • Not smoking
  • Daily exercise (even bedridden patients need activity)
  • Good nutrition
  • Maintaining a healthy weight
  • Adequate hygiene
  • Moving and turning
  • Asking your family or caregiver to help you move and turn if you are confined to a bed or chair

How Do Hospitals and Nursing Homes Prevent Pressure Ulcers?

Your nurses and doctors will begin a plan of care to help keep your skin healthy. If you are not able to move yourself, the hospital or nursing home staff will help you move and turn. They may use special skin care products to protect your skin, and connect you with a dietitian to help you improve your diet. If your nurse or doctor suspects an ulcer, he or she will work to relieve pressure on the area. In some cases, a special mattress or bed may be used to help redistribute pressure.

Even though your skin is one of the most complex and important organs in your body, caring for it is not complicated. Follow these simple steps, and ask your doctor if you have further concerns about potential pressure ulcers.

When Do You Know Loved Ones Need Care?

By Pam Gennings, Executive Director Special Projects*

Over the years I have talked to many family members who come home for the holidays and become concerned because they have noticed “changes” in their loved one or their circumstances.

They are not always sure if home care services are needed or if their concern is unfounded. The following indicators can be used as a guide to help determine if your loved one could benefit from home care services.

Medical Condition

  • New diagnosis
  • New medications or treatments ordered by a physician
  • Terminal illness
  • Recently discharged from a hospital or nursing facility
  • Physician has restricted activity during a period of recuperation—this could be a few days or several weeks
  • Frequent falls or fear of falling
  • Confusion, forgetfulness, depression or other changes in mental status
  • No longer able to/should not drive or driving is very limited
  • Frequent trips to the doctor, urgent care or ER
  • Uses an assistive device (cane, walker, wheelchair or stair climber) to help with balance or walking
  • Is required to take several daily medications

Caregiver Relief

  • The person being cared for should not be left alone and may require 24-hour supervision
  • Spouse/family members work
  • Caregiver appears to be stressed and overwhelmed
  • Spouse/family members in poor health
  • The person being cared for needs more assistance than the caregiver is able or willing to provide

Strong Desire to Remain at Home But is Unsure of How to Manage Because…

  • There is limited support from family or others
  • Spouse is in poor health
  • They worry about emergency situations
  • Family does not want loved one to be alone
  • They need assistance with housekeeping, laundry, meal preparation, shopping, bathing, hair care, medication reminders, transportation, or other essential daily tasks

If your loved one has one or more of the indicators listed above, call Oxford HealthCare and ask to speak with a Care Coordinator.

A qualified home care professional will:

  • Identify needs and available services
  • Evaluate funding sources and community services
  • Coordinate services upon request 

*Pam Gennings has a Bachelor’s of Arts and has worked in the field of Geriatric Social Work and Care Coordination for more than 30 years. She started working for Oxford HealthCare in 1993. During the course of her career she has helped thousands of people find resources to remain in their homes as well as provided guidance to families that were facing difficulties with their aging loved ones.

National Family Caregivers Month

CaregiverRecognizing and supporting caregivers is tremendously important.

This month, please take the time to lend a hand, or at least a kind word, to someone you know that Is caring for another. Whether the need comes from aging, disability, illness or injury, there are so many willing to take up the difficult task of caregiving.

We at Oxford honor the dedication and devotion of those caregivers always, but especially during this month.

Presidential Proclamation — National Family Caregivers Month, 2016

NATIONAL FAMILY CAREGIVERS MONTH, 2016

– – – – – – –

BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

A PROCLAMATION

Our Nation was founded on the fundamental ideal that we all do better when we look out for one another, and every day, millions of Americans from every walk of life balance their own needs with those of their loved ones as caregivers. During National Family Caregivers Month, we reaffirm our support for those who give of themselves to be there for their family, friends, and neighbors in challenging times, and we pledge to carry forward the progress we have made in our health care system and workplaces to give caregivers the resources and flexibility they need.

Each of us may find ourselves in need of or providing care at some point in our lives. That is why it is imperative that we maintain and expand the Affordable Care Act (ACA). At the time Medicare was created, only a little more than half of all seniors had some form of health insurance. Today, the ACA has given older Americans better care and more access to discounted prescriptions and certain preventive services at no cost. The ACA has also expanded options for home- and community-based services, so that, with the help of devoted, loving caregivers, more Americans are now able to live independently and with dignity. And because looking after an aging family member or a friend with a disability can be challenging, States and local agencies connect individuals with caregiver support groups and respite care. The women and men who put their loved ones before themselves show incredible generosity every day, and we must continue to support them in every task they selflessly carry out.

Many devoted caregivers across our country also attend to members of our Armed Forces when they return home, and my Administration is committed to improving the care and support our veterans and their families receive. For over 5 years, First Lady Michelle Obama and Dr. Jill Biden’s Joining Forces initiative has worked to ensure those who look after our service members who come home with the wounds of war — whether they are visible or not — have the community and Government support they need to help their siblings and spouses, parents and children, neighbors and friends through one of the greatest battles they may face: the fight to recover and heal.

This month, and every month, let us lift up all those who work to tirelessly advance the health and wellness of those they love. Let us encourage those who choose to be caregivers and look toward a future where our politics and our policies reflect the selflessness and open-hearted empathy they show their loved ones every day.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, BARACK OBAMA, President of the United States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and the laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim November 2016 as National Family Caregivers Month. I encourage all Americans to pay tribute to those who provide for the health and well-being of their family members, friends, and neighbors.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this thirty-first day of October, in the year of our Lord two thousand sixteen, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and forty-first.

BARACK OBAMA